Bombaywaali by SheThePeople with Tisca Chopra and me

One of the more exciting new assignments I’ve taken up recently is Ideas Editor with SheThePeople, and anchoring the Bombaywaali series of conversations. The first edition I anchored was held on Thursday April 27th, at Title Waves in Bandra, Mumbai to a packed house, and my guest was the very warm, witty and eloquent Tisca Chopra.

Here’s what Tisca spoke about:

Making it big in Bollywood doesn’t come easy. At SheThePeople.TV’s Bombaywaali event, actress Tisca Chopra spoke about her journey into filmdom and shared several anecdotes, some shocking and some hilarious.

Growing up in Noida, Delhi, moving to Bombay was a culture shock for her. Right from finding a place to live to navigating the streets of the city, Bombay was an entirely new experience for her.

https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2FSheThePeoplePage%2Fvideos%2F1640137539350785%2F&show_text=0&width=400

On her first break:

The story of how she got her first film is also tied to her experience of finding a place to live in the city. Her first landlady was very bizarre, she says. She and the other landladies were all connected and would get together and gossip about their tenants. Tisca hadn’t told her that she was auditioning to be an actress. It so happened that she went to audition for a director who was the son of someone the landlady knew. When Tisca came back from the audition, she found the door locked. She could see the landlady’s feet through the door chain, but she didn’t answer. That night, Tisca slept on the steps outside the house. The landlady had found out about the audition and was upset. She and Tisca had a face-off for many days, till the landlady fell sick. Her son didn’t care and she had nobody to take care of her, so Tisca stepped in. After she recovered, the landlady got the director (her friend’s son) to the apartment, and that’s how Tisca signed her first film.

Read more about the event here

And here are some pictures from the evening.

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The Married Feminist this week: Stop asking “Why didn’t she leave?”

The wife of a Silicon Valley CEO reported long term domestic violence and abuse. Her husband, a software engineer who had emigrated to California in 2005 from India,  and currently the CEO of Cuberon, got just two weeks in jail for the long term domestic violence he subjected his wife to.

Read The Full Story About This Abusive Husband

The couple had had an arranged marriage, a concept both of them were comfortable with, given their roots in India. The trouble in their marriage cropped up a few months into their marriage and in 2013, he was arrested for assaulting her outside their home.  She stayed on in the marriage. The violence in their marriage was so horrific, he has been recorded saying he would like to stab her 45 times, to see her murdered. He hit her multiple times, on her face, arms, stomach, pulled her by the hair, abused her with the filthiest abuses. Their daughter speaks on camera stating she is terrified of her father. He brainwashed her into believing she was a disgrace to the family and that she should commit suicide. It took years of video documentation of evidence of abuse before she gathered the courage to file a complaint against him. And then, did she get the justice she deserved?

Kiran Manral The Married Feminist SheThePeople

There are the other voices that keep asking, with the nonchalance of those not in the same situation, “Why did she wait so long.?” Their implication, that the delay in complaining against the perpetrator puts the blame back on her, the victim. After the sentencing, she told the court, “I cannot articulate my despair at this treatment of his crimes. It’s as if we are giving him a slap on his wrist because he got caught,” she told the court, “I believe you have the power to restore some faith in my heart that I wasn’t completely made a fool of, by this criminal and the judicial system.” Her helplessness and despair is what many victims of domestic violence have to combat.

Abhishek-Gattani

A hashtag on Twitter #WhyIStayed is a revelation about why many women feel unable to escape a domestic violence situation, even though they may be educated and financially independent. There are blocks to them leaving which aren’t always physical, which isn’t to discount the very physical threat to their well being and often their lives that domestic violence victims have to constantly battle.

Read the entire article here

My TEDx Talk at IIT Roorkee on Surrendering to the Muse

Published on Apr 20, 2017

The muse is fickle, capricious and very demanding. But for a creative person, the Muse is someone he or she needs to woo and charm. What does the Muse demand? And why must a creative person surrender to the Muse in order to create? What are the things a creative person need to do in order to have the Muse stick around? The answers might surprise you.

Kiran Manral worked as a journalist with The Times of India and The Asian Age and was among the top bloggers in India. She currently writes a column on sexuality at DNA and on feminism at shethepeople.tv
She was part of the core founding team of Child Sexual Abuse Awareness Month and Violence Against Women Awareness Month. She is a a mentor with Sheroes, Qween and Back 2 The Front, and is an advisor on the Board of Literature Studio, Delhi.

This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx

Kiran Manral worked as a journalist with The Times of India and The Asian Age and was among the top bloggers in India. Her books include
She currently writes a column on sexuality at DNA, on feminism at shethepeople.tv and has previously been a columnist-blogger on gender issues with Tehelka.
She was part of the core founding team of Child Sexual Abuse Awareness Month and Violence Against Women Awareness Month, two social media initiatives that ran for four years. She also initiated India Helps, a volunteer network to help disaster victims which worked on the rehabilitation of 26/11 attack victims.
She is also on the planning board of the Kumaon Literary Festival, Chair of the Women Unlimited Series of the Taj Colloquium, a mentor with Sheroes, Qween and Back 2 The Front, and is an advisor on the Board of Literature Studio, Delhi.

This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx

Watch the video here https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7R5W3VatZY0&feature=youtu.be